42

The bike you have is a decent low/mid-range hybrid bike with entry-level name-brand components. It should absolutely be mostly trouble-free with basic maintenance for a daily 4 mile commute. While replacing the cheap plastic pedals with a decent set of metal or high-quality poly pedals is standard business for any new bike, the other problems are worrying. ...


22

I periodically check and pull out the street glass shards I have been doing the same for as long as I have a bike. Glass shards, small sharp stones, nails, drawing pins... name something I haven't pulled out of my tires! But I never worried of patching the tire, and never had problems because of that. My tires (even those which weren't puncture resistant) ...


19

Firstly, I do agree with some of the other answers that riding better can help - my main hazard is glass, and I simply got fewer punctures as I got better at spotting and avoiding it. Knowing how to avoid or handle bumps and potholes is similarly useful. Why does my bike constantly break/need servicing? Some of your issues are normal, but some are ...


18

The way you asked the question, it sounds like you think the following is happening: first, the derailleur hanger wears out/weakens, then it snaps, and this causes the derailleur to go into the spokes. It is much more likely that the chain of events is the following: the derailleur is mis-adjusted, when you shift to the largest cog on the rear, the ...


16

The only times you need to consider the tyre is if the hole is large enough for the inner tube to poke through, or if the hole is in the thin sidewall I once had a hole that was ~1 mm across, and seemed okay. It took about 3 flats every 200 km of riding to realise that the tube was herniating through the hole and wearing through. A black tube and a black ...


15

The one substitution that will probably give you the most bang for your buck is better tires. High-quality tires roll with much less rolling resistance, have better grip, weigh less, and roll over small imperfections more easily. And if you're riding on tires with knobby treads, but only riding on the road, tires with minimal/no tread will ride much faster ...


14

I would say that this won't have any effect. Flipping the chainring on a single speed makes sense as you use the other side of the teeth on the chainring which have not been used before. But with the chain it's a different story: The stretch is independent of directions so reversing its direction won't change anything. Also on the small "rolls" in the chain ...


12

If it's bad luck, it's very bad luck. Some of those are issues I haven't faced in 30 000 miles (handlebars and BB shouldn't work loose). Mudguard and chain case issues could probably be fixed with self-locking nuts (they work loose, then the flexing causes breakages). The loose cranks and a few of the other issues sound like they weren't properly tightened ...


11

If it's a large enough cut that the tube pokes through the tyre once inflated, then the best solution is to use a regular tube patch on the inner surface of the tyre with the vulcanising glue just like when patching a tube. While less recommended, I've also had success just using a drop of superglue for a small cut in a tyre.


10

This can be a fairly common occurrence with a fixed wheel bike. It may depend on a few different things, ie what sort of nuts you are using, how tight they are, what style of dropouts, and what the dropouts are made of. A different sort of nuts may help. eg something with serrated nuts or washers could grip better. Also you may be able to tighten the nuts ...


10

You can cut an aluminum soda can into a small strip and wrap that around and fold it like a tiny burrito into the end. Crimp with pliers. Picture lovingly misappropriated from http://billgrady.com/wp/2002/11/14/how-to-wrap-a-burrito/


10

Aesthetically, it's just a case of keeping it clean. Use a toothbrush to clear accumulated dirt out of the little nooks and crannies, like the joints between tubes (especially around the bottom bracket). Waxing the frame can help keep that brand-new lustre. The back of the chainring and spider, sprockets, rear hub, and dropouts, can get grotty pretty ...


10

Interesting question. Real world conditions are messy with multiple factors impacting any analysis, as such my answer will be speculative, but based on a number of sensible working assumptions. Chainring degradation as a source First lets consider how much material comes off a chainring. Generally speaking, if you replace your chain regularly before it ...


10

I think road bikes are actually more durable than a lot of riders give them credit for. Unless you were seriously crashing into potholes there should not be any damage (although you may have picked up some paint dings from loose gravel surfaces). You can do a standard 'once-over', paying particular attention to the wheels: If the dirty or muddy give it a ...


9

One proven way to retain the "new" feeling of a bike is to keep adding new parts to it. It's a well known (I would say proven but can't find the article) fact that people experience a noticeable performance boost when riding a new bike or upgrading gear. This expectation of better performance actually does lead to a small performance increase. The same ...


9

Anything colder than -55F (-48C) is difficult to mechanically maintain. Most lubrication products on the market for cold weather are rated to -60F (-51C). Which means that at -50F (-45C) they become almost unrideable and at -55F (-48C) pretty much unrideable. I am aware of products rated for colder than that, but they have issues that when stored at room ...


9

Basically every metal-in-metal thread on a bike should get some kind of treatment, because at the very least none of them are perfectly corrosion resistant, and as you say, thread lubrication helps with tightening. What it really does is greatly reduce all the many factors that create friction in threads, usually into the negligible range, so that a given ...


9

That's a lot of problems for a bicycle that's used for such short distances. It's possible that you're being hard on the bike. One thing you should always try to do is to lift your weight off the saddle when you go over bumps: especially potholes and speed bumps. This is doubly important if you're heavy but you should still do it even if you aren't. You don'...


8

Revised to make a more standalone answer, rather than rely on the context given by @FalseIdentity's question, and to incorporate some of the commentary. As with all testing, we want to find problems, so we need to do things what will discover them. But we are also the test pilot, so we have to maintain safety. Essentially, we need to test every aspect of ...


8

Forks are not a 'wear component' that need to be replaced periodically. Bicycle frame makes are clever enough to make their products sufficiently durable and it's not something riders generally need to worry about. That said there obviously are instances of frames and forks cracking and failing, but this is not the norm. However, in your particular case, ...


8

There are two aspects to the question. You asked about what parts would improve the riding experience with maintenance or replacement. You also could consider upgrading some items as they wear out. Parts to maintain Chances are that your chain and cassette were worn out. As your chain wears out, your shifting will get sloppier. If you change your chain ...


7

Where possible, replace with stainless fasteners. Things like water bottle bracket bolts are readily available in stainless at a good hardware store. But most fasteners on a good quality bike are stainless to begin with, so it may be that you're not seeing "rust" per se but rather a sort of corrosion that can form on stainless.


7

After cleaning I give the bolts a small squirt of WD40 followed by a good rub down. This leaves a very fine film of oil that won't hold dirt but is just enough to stave off the rust if done regularly. The spray also displaces (WD, water displacement, geddit?) any water left from cleaning in any little gaps.


7

The empty ink-tube of a ballpoint pen makes good cable ends. The metal ones may be squeezed into place. If you have a plastic one cut off 1 cm, put over the cable end and heat with a flame.


7

Yes, it is time to change that tire! Your current front tire looks to be in very good shape so when you purchase a new tire you should put it on the front wheel and then move the old front tire onto the rear wheel. Continental road tires have helpful wear indicator dots on them that will show you when the tread of the tire has reached its recommended ...


7

If this helps at all, I used a set of Marathon Plus tires on a cross-Canada tour last year (8200km), plus a bunch of commutting, totaling about 11,000km. I did not get any flats at any point, but by the end of that distance, the rear tire was pretty bald and I decided to stop using it. Here's a picture of the tires around 10,000km, front tire on the left ...


7

The most important thing to do to keep the inside dry and prevent excess rust is a proper drain hole on the underside of the bottom bracket. Outside of issues with heavily salted roads, drain holes are enough to prevent meaningful rust. The next step is something like Weigle framesaver, or just a blast of aerosol lube every couple years in each tube. ...


7

The most important thing is that there is no standing water inside the tubes. Usually there are drainage holes around the rear dropouts and bottom bracket. Make sure the holes exist and are not obstructed. You can look inside the frame through the bottom bracket, seat tube and head tube. Some people use oil or wax-based surface treatments against rust, e.g. ...


6

I suspect that the abrasion from road/chainring/cogs is negligible, especially when comparing with other causes. The silica grains (SiO2, present almost everywhere) would be more of a worrying issue than the aluminium oxide, regarding chain wear. The grains are often visible (in sub millimetre size) and easily stick on the chain after a ride on any road ...


6

The correct tire pressure for you is typically not whats written on the tire sidewall. That's an arbitrary number determined by the marketing and legal departments at the tire manufacturer, not the engineers (usually it leads to an overinflated tire, which can damage the wheel and reduce control of the bike). You'll have to play with the pressure to get a ...


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